Into the Heart of the Alps

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I Love Gummi Bears, July 4, 2011

Stage 6, D58 (St-Martin-Vesubie à St Sauveur-sur-Tinee)

11.78 miles, 2,522’ up, 4,185’ down

Go to this map and hover over the triangles to see where the stage we just completed is relative to the entire trail.  (The stage beginning and end locations are probably backwards, as we are doing the trail in the opposite direction.)

When we were trekking with our kids in the Bavarian Alps over ten years ago, other hikers suggested that we take gummi bears as treats for them. We remembered this in the past few days and have been carrying them with us on this trek. They are amazing - any difficult uphill becomes more bearable after a short break with gummi bears! We are already on our second bag.

Today was a mostly downhill day. A lot of the walking was on the walls of terraces that were built into the steep hillsides everywhere, often next to open stone irrigation channels that may well still be in use from medieval times.  We also walked on many paved and unpaved country lanes, picking wild strawberries and "tame" raspberries as we found them.

Alps
High Alps Ahead
Our lunch in the town of Rimplas was absolutely amazing. First, the decor - pictures of people and mountains from someone's trip to Nepal - had us planning future treks after the Via Alpina adventure is over!  We shared salad (fresh that minute from someone's garden) and a plate of cheese and jambon (various hams) to die for. All adorned with home-made sundried tomatoes.
Rimplas 
Town of Rimplas
The weather has been really good until this afternoon, when it rained buckets (while we were trying to find a place to stay). Only place available in St.-Sauveur-sur-Tinee was the unstaffed gite run by the town; a dorm room with kitchen and bath that only had one other occupant. Simon is a Brit who has been living in Australia for 25 years; he recently retired and essentially fills his year with different hiking adventures. Together, we cooked a meal with vegetables (haven't seen too many of those yet on this trip) and discussed world politics. We will be following the same path as Simon for the next few days.
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