Press Room Videos

Additional Resources

CARMA

2008 News Archive

December 2008

A cardiologist's determination to cure the troubled heart

"A breakthough in his research eight years ago led Nassir Marrouche to believe atrial fibrillation could be cured. 'Six years ago when I would talk to patients about a cure rather than a drug treatment for atrial fibrillation, people thought I was crazy,' recalls Nassir F. Marrouche, M.D., assistant professor of internal medicine and director of the U's Atrial Fibrillation Program. 'Now, those critics are sending their family members to me.'" Read more: University Hospital Foundation

November 2008

MR imaging: New techniques for the treatment of atrial fibrillation

"Dr. Marrouche is the Director of the Cardiac Electrophysiology Laboratories and the Atrial Fibrillation Program at the University of Utah School of Medicine, which for more than 20 years has been a leader in developing innovative MRI applications. In this article, Dr. Marrouche describes his innovative ablation technique using MRI." Read more: EP Lab Digest

Modified MRI helps protect healthy tissue

"Although surgery can help a patient who is suffering from irregular heartbeats avoid heart failure, the technique burns through diseased parts of the heart and occasionally destroys healthy tissue.  When healthy tissue is destroyed, patients can suffer from worse heart problems and occasionally die from the surgery. The problems associated with the procedure motivated U researcher Nassir Marrouche to spend 16 years working on a less evasive procedure. He spent three of those years modifying what an MRI machine reads to help surgeons see the healthy tissue and not accidentally burn through it." Read more: Daily Utah Chronicle

Breakthrough: Use of MRI in Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

"A team led by Dr. Nassir Marrouche, the Director of the Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Program at the University Of Utah School Of Medicine, is pioneering the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in catheter ablation, which could represent a breakthrough in the treatment of atrial fibrillation." Read more: StopAfib.org.

October 2008

U. technique aiding arrhythmia patients

"A new imaging technique puts the University of Utah at the heart of cardiac research.  The research, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, identifies a new way of using magnetic resonance imaging to detect and measure injuries to the heart's left atrium wall in patients who had atrial fibrillation treatment." Read more: Deseret News

Predicting success of treatment for atrial fibrillation aided by novel imaging approach

"'Until now, there has not been an accurate, non-invasive way to assess LA scar formation,' said lead author Nassir F. Marrouche, M.D., assistant professor of internal medicine in the University of Utah School of Medicine and director of the Atrial-Fibrillation Program. 'We have developed a novel MRI-based method to detect and measure the extent of LA wall scarring and, potentially, predict the success of RF ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation.'" Read more: Medical News Today

June 2008

MRI enters the EP and cath lab to assist in treating atrial fibrillation.

"Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects more than 3.5 million Americans and is a major source of strokes and a precursor to potentially fatal deterioration of the heart. Although physicians in the last decade have treated the condition with radiofrequency ablation, overall success rates have been limited. A 2007 report of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Task Force on catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation noted that results are widely variable, due in part to differences in technique, follow-up, definitions of success, use of anti-arrhythmic therapy and in the experience and technical proficiency of the electrophysiologist." Read more: Diagnostic & Interventional Cardiology

May 2008

U. doctor receives award for heart study

"Dr. Nassir Marrouche and his research team from the University of Utah School of Medicine will receive the Eric N. Prystowsky Fellow Clinical Research award during the Heart Rhythm Society's annual scientific sessions in San Francisco this week."Read more: Deseret News

MRI Shines New Light on Atrial Fibrillation

"MRI enters the EP and cath lab to assist in treating atrial fibrillation.  Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects more than 3.5 million Americans and is a major source of strokes and a precursor to potentially fatal deterioration of the heart. Although physicians in the last decade have treated the condition with radiofrequency ablation, overall success rates have been limited. A 2007 report of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Task Force on catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation noted that results are widely variable, due in part to differences in technique, follow-up, definitions of success, use of anti-arrhythmic therapy and in the experience and technical proficiency of the electrophysiologist." Read more: Diagnostic & Interventional Cardiology

MRI: A Game-Changing Tool for Treating Atrial Fibrillation

"The federal laws that regulate certain economics of imaging seem to mirror the topsy-turvy world of Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass. Because of the flawed methodology of the sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula for determining physician Medicare payments, the more we improve technologies (thus increasing their utilization), the less they are worth. This perverse logic fails to recognize the overall cost benefits of these technological advances, not to mention their inestimable value to patients." Read more: Imaging Economics

April 2008

MRI May change heart care

"A heart expert at the University of Utah predicts that a well-known tool commonly used in other areas of medicine — magnetic resonance imaging — is poised to change how a heart rhythm disorder is treated." Read more: Deseret News