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THIS IS NOT ONLY A TEST

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A new device designed to more effectively produce DNA samples for genetic testing from slide-mounted tissue samples is better equipped than most models on the market to help in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The impact could be substantial since genetic testing is becoming more popular in the fight against cancer, and the demand for efficient dissection tools is growing.

Co-invented by Katherine Geiersbach, assistant professor in the University of Utah Department of Pathology, AvanSci Bio recently started selling the new device called MESO-1. The company was formed in 2011 and has already attracted significant funding, including funds from private investors and grants from the University of Utah, the Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development, and the Federal Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.

Laboratories performing genetic testing to detect mutations in cancer are one of the main target audiences for this technology. The industry standard is to use a scalpel to scrape part of a tumor off a slide. This method is inexpensive and works for many samples, but it falls short when precision is required. A laser method also exists to collect precise samples, but those instruments can cost up to $500,000. MESO-1 falls in between these two competing methods by providing a more accurate sample than scraping slides by hand, while being much less expensive than laser methods.

THIS IS NOT ONLY A TESTA new device designed to more effectively produce DNA samples for genetic testing from slide-mounted tissue samples is better equipped than most models on the market to help in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The impact could be substantial since genetic testing is becoming more popular in the fight against cancer, and the demand for efficient dissection tools is growing.

A new device designed to more effectively produce DNA samples for genetic testing from slide-mounted tissue samples is better equipped than most models on the market to help in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The impact could be substantial since genetic testing is becoming more popular in the fight against cancer, and the demand for efficient dissection tools is growing.

Co-invented by Katherine Geiersbach, assistant professor in the University of Utah Department of Pathology, AvanSci Bio recently started selling the new device called MESO-1. The company was formed in 2011 and has already attracted significant funding, including funds from private investors and grants from the University of Utah, the Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development, and the Federal Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.

Laboratories performing genetic testing to detect mutations in cancer are one of the main target audiences for this technology. The industry standard is to use a scalpel to scrape part of a tumor off a slide. This method is inexpensive and works for many samples, but it falls short when precision is required. A laser method also exists to collect precise samples, but those instruments can cost up to $500,000. MESO-1 falls in between these two competing methods by providing a more accurate sample than scraping slides by hand, while being much less expensive than laser methods.

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