tap to open menu

Should these people get tenure?

AS WE EXPLORE MORE PROGRESSIVE DEFINITIONS OF SCHOLARSHIP AND DISSEMINATION, FACULTY WHO WERE NOT TENURE-BOUND AT THE OUTSET OF THEIR CAREERS NOW EMERGE AS STARS. IS IT TIME TO RETHINK TENURE? DO WE NEED NEW WAYS TO RECOGNIZE AND REWARD INDIVIDUALS MAKING SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS?

  • 1. The Digital Anatomist

    Revolutionized anatomy education with the development of the first comprehensive, Web-based anatomy portal. Has earned national recognition in medical pedagogy for his research on the impact of cadaver dissection. Has authored multiple anatomy texts, including Gray’s Dissection Guide for Human Anatomy.

  • 2. The Multimedia Educator

    Directs the most widely used online genetics resource in the world, which received more than 47 million page views in 2012 and won the 2010 Prize for Online Resources in Education from the journal Science. Currently holds four NIH grants.

  • The Community Changemaker
    3. The Community Changemaker

    Created a first-of-its-kind life skills training program that connects occupational therapy students with new Americans who arrived with refugee status. Publishes and presents both nationally and internationally on refugee resettlement and community-based practice.

  • 4. The Global Teacher

    Leads the only continuing medical education program for physician assistants in Ghana. Selected as the liaison for the Physician Assistant Education Association to the Consortium of Universities for Global Health. Collaborates with the World Health Organization to increase the physician assistant workforce worldwide.

  • The Community Changemaker
    5. The Implementation Scientist

    Invented and implemented the e-Asthma Tracker, a tool for patients that shifts asthma care to a new model that is continuous and proactive. It focuses on preventing rather than managing exacerbations and dramatically reduces asthma readmission rates. The tool generated $1.2 million in a grant from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and recently earned a $1.9 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).

Share

Download

Join our newsletter