2013 Algorithms Articles

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Telemedicine: all hype, or new hope for the underserved?

Some say telemedicine distances health providers from patients. Jonathan Linkous says it draws them close.

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Is value a fact-free zone in health care? Michael Porter challenges health systems to redefine the value agenda

Value. It's supposed to be the savior of U.S. health care, a fragmented and opaque delivery system where prices are completely divorced from costs, quality or customer satisfaction.

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Limited Time Offer: Major Employers Seek Partners to Fix Health Care

It's not everyday that the Walt Disney Corporation courts business partners. But their classified ad today might read something like this:

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Holy Window Washing, Batman! How superheroes and others are working together for patients in Hershey, PA

What do Spiderman and Batman have to do with patient care? In Hershey Pennsylvania, they play an important role.

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Malcolm Gladwell on disruptive innovation: The importance of urgency and disagreeableness

Being impatient and disagreeable generally are not considered admirable qualities. But Malcolm Gladwell suggests they may be exactly the characteristics needed to drive innovation forward. He points to Apple founder Steve Jobs as Exhibit A.

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Is big pharma advancing or stalling medical innovation? Former NEJM editor Marcia Angell, M.D. weighs in

Bias has no home in medical research. But as relationships between multi-billion dollar pharmaceutical companies and academic medical centers become dangerously intertwined, bias is now unavoidable.

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Understanding and Navigating Twitter for Health Care Professionals

Spring means tulips and conferences. And joining social media can be a terrific way to interact with other conference-goers or see what's happening at a conference across the country without leaving your desk. It can also be a boost for business, reputation and new way to interact with patients, consumers and peers. But getting started can be a bit daunting. For help launching your Twitter account, download the Twitter 101 for Physicians PDF. You can also view the PDF online.

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In Case You Missed It: Activating the Public's Perception of Academic Medicine

Most medical schools are seen as ivory towers filled with intellects that have little in common with average people. In this era of change, it's not the image most Universities want or need. During a session titled 'Activating the Public's Perception of Academic Medicine,' guest speakers offered insight and solutions into helping academic medical centers break through the stereotypes and connect more with the public and key stakeholders. First step? Don't call ourselves academic medical centers.

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3 takeaways about Writing and Publishing from Academic Medicine

For almost 90 year- and through four name changes - Academic Medicine has been a forum of information and exchange for administrators and faculty of academic medical centers in the United States and abroad. In their session titled "The Art of Writing and Getting Published," David P. Sklar, editor-in-chief, Jennifer Campi, senior staff editor, and Mary Beth DeVilbiss, managing editor share tips to increase your chances of getting published in the journal.

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Improving diversity in medicine

New mentoring network connects peers across the country to brainstorm plans for better inclusion in the biomedical workforce. The Clinical and Translational Science National Research Mentoring Network is working to ensure the biomedical workforce becomes more diverse.

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Population Health is Precision Medicine for Neighborhoods

For decades we have been facing a health care crisis. Payment imbalances, lagging educational reform, physician shortages, you name it, the health care landscape has been ignoring the inevitable for a long time. When the Association of American Medical Centers (AAMC) met this week in Philadelphia to discuss health care reform, two primary care advocates took the stage to discuss the challenges Academic Medical Centers (AMC's) face in delivering population health.

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Carve out time for scholarship by thinking creatively

Why is making time for scholarship in academic medicine so hard to achieve

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Rally call: Leaders in academic medicine encouraged to become trailblazers in era of health care reform

Health care as an industry has found itself at a pivotal "moment of truth" and leaders in academic medicine must step up to the plate to help find solutions during a challenging era of transformation, the president of the Association of American Medical Colleges said on Saturday.

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Health care survival in the future: Who is poised to take the lead?

Former Utah governor tells health care professionals that reform is an economic reality; changes must take place.

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Should we protect the current health care system or the U.S. economy? We can't do both, says James Orlikoff

Simply reducing health care costs in the United States isn't enough, says health care consultant James Orlikoff. The country must reverse its rate of health care cost growth - or watch its economy collapse.

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Can the U.S. health care system be rescued by physicians?

President Obama's health care reform simply won't work, said Arnold Relman, M.D. , former editor-in-chief of the New England Journal of Medicine and professor emeritus of medicine and social medicine at Harvard Medical School. His complaint: It doesn't go far enough.

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What can health care providers learn from car manufacturers about providing greater value?

Imagine a health care system with zero falls, no medication errors and not a single death from a hospital-acquired infection. Upholding health care's "do no harm" oath isn't easy in today's modern hospitals. In 1999, a landmark Institute of Medicine report found that as many as 98,000 patients died each year from preventable medical errors. Nearly a decade later, a 2010 investigation by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services put that figure closer to 180,000 patients for Medicare beneficiaries alone, and estimated the annual hospital care costs for these events at $4.4 billion.

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Can scientific animations lead to new discoveries? Janet Iwasa, Ph.D., says next-generation visualization speeds research

Drawing pictures. As simplistic and unscientific as it sounds, pictures have been one of the most powerful tools scientists have used to help them understand and explain the unknown. Today, the rough sketches of centuries past have given way to elaborate computer animations that are helping researchers understand the inner workings of some of the most mysterious and miniscule science there is - that of cell processes deep within our bodies.

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Bundled Payments: Is it time for health care providers to start acting like general contractors?

Imagine what college tuition would look like if higher education charged on a fee-for-service model, suggested Harvard Business School luminary Clayton Christensen. Education would be broken down into specific services, and students would be charged separately for each lecture they attended, each test they took, each hour they spent in a lab. It would be ¿a nightmare,¿ says Christensen. ¿How do you price English Literature 335? How would you price Chemistry 311? The value of courses is not knowable.¿

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How can we make health care affordable and accessible in developing countries?

It became known as the "baby bong project." Stanford University students looking for cost-effective ways to build inhalers for impoverished children in Latin America stumbled upon an unorthodox method during their research process.

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Could supercomputers like IBM's Watson be a physician's new best friend? Martin Kohn believes it's the future

Talk about TMI. One trillion devices are moving at breakneck speed, generating 2.5 quintillion bytes of data per day. In the world of medicine, information is doubling every five years. In 2010 alone, 700,000 new articles were catalogued by the National Library of Medicine.

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How can we get better, cheaper therapies from bench to bedside?

Clearly, the drug development process is under significant stress. Vicki Seyfert-Margolis, Ph.D. former Senior Advisor for Science Innovation and Policy at the U.S Food and Drug Administration, recently visited the University of Utah Health Sciences to talk about some of the most significant challenges facing drug development and offer some possible solutions.

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How can the FDA help speed up the drug discovery process?

If necessity is indeed the mother of invention, then our current drug development model is ripe for change. "If we want health care and medical products to be accessible, they have to be available at a price that is affordable," says Frank F. Weichold M.D., Ph.D., the Director of Critical Path and Regulatory Science Initiatives at the FDA. "And as such, we have to rethink how we develop drugs, how we develop products, and how we approve them."

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Are on-site health clinics the health care solution for employers?

As health care costs continue their long arc upward, what's a company to do? According to an article in the Washington Post, companies employing 10 or more workers paid an average of $10,588 per employee for health care benefits last year. Facing unsustainable financial pressure to provide health care benefits to their employees, many employers are shifting the cost to their employees: requiring them to pay higher insurance premiums and deductibles or by reducing services in health care plans.

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What are the ways your organization is forcing innovation?

"You know the old adage, "Change is good. You go first," quipped AAMC President Darrell Kirch at the association's annual meeting in early November. While that may have described the attitude of academic medical centers (AMCs) in the past, Kirch says he's finding more people are willing to go first.

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The question is are we going to support it or is it going to have to come from a consumer base?

In a recent interview with Eric Topol, M.D., at the AAMC 2012 conference, the Utah Innovation team heard one view of the role of both individualized health care and health care providers in the coming years. Topol is and has been an advocate for the use of wireless devices to empower patients by allowing them to tune in to their body via medical apps and other devices.

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