2013 Algorithms Video

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Patient Engagement

Patients must be involved in their own care to improve quality and control costs, but we need their voice in how we run our business. Their experience will drive how we deliver care more efficiently and effectively.

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The Virtuous Cycle

The delivery system is influencing education, and educating is improving the delivery system. Education, scholarship and service all work together in the virtuous cycle.

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Can the U.S. health care system be rescued by physicians?

President Obama's health care reform simply won't work, said Arnold Relman, M.D. , former editor-in-chief of the New England Journal of Medicine and professor emeritus of medicine and social medicine at Harvard Medical School. His complaint: It doesn't go far enough.

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What can health care providers learn from car manufacturers about providing greater value?

Imagine a health care system with zero falls, no medication errors and not a single death from a hospital-acquired infection. Upholding health care's "do no harm" oath isn't easy in today's modern hospitals. In 1999, a landmark Institute of Medicine report found that as many as 98,000 patients died each year from preventable medical errors. Nearly a decade later, a 2010 investigation by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services put that figure closer to 180,000 patients for Medicare beneficiaries alone, and estimated the annual hospital care costs for these events at $4.4 billion.

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Can scientific animations lead to new discoveries?

Drawing pictures. As simplistic and unscientific as it sounds, pictures have been one of the most powerful tools scientists have used to help them understand and explain the unknown. Today, the rough sketches of centuries past have given way to elaborate computer animations that are helping researchers understand the inner workings of some of the most mysterious and miniscule science there is - that of cell processes deep within our bodies.

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Why Utah?

Why Utah? That's an all-too-familiar question for those of us who have chosen to live and work in the Beehive State. So we decided to ask some of our rock star faculty, who could choose to work almost anywhere, why they've chosen to work at University of Utah Health Sciences. Their honest responses and remarkable accomplishments tell a pretty compelling story. Watch the video and then let us know what your impression of Utah is.

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How can we make health care affordable and accessible in developing countries?

It became known as the "baby bong project." Stanford University students looking for cost-effective ways to build inhalers for impoverished children in Latin America stumbled upon an unorthodox method during their research process.

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Could supercomputers like IBM's Watson be a physician's new best friend?

Talk about TMI. One trillion devices are moving at breakneck speed, generating 2.5 quintillion bytes of data per day. In the world of medicine, information is doubling every five years. In 2010 alone, 700,000 new articles were catalogued by the National Library of Medicine.

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How can we get better, cheaper therapies from bench to bedside?

Clearly, the drug development process is under significant stress. Vicki Seyfert-Margolis, Ph.D. former Senior Advisor for Science Innovation and Policy at the U.S Food and Drug Administration, recently visited the University of Utah Health Sciences to talk about some of the most significant challenges facing drug development and offer some possible solutions.

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How can the FDA help speed up the drug discovery process?

If necessity is indeed the mother of invention, then our current drug development model is ripe for change. "If we want health care and medical products to be accessible, they have to be available at a price that is affordable," says Frank F. Weichold M.D., Ph.D., the Director of Critical Path and Regulatory Science Initiatives at the FDA. "And as such, we have to rethink how we develop drugs, how we develop products, and how we approve them."

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Are on-site health clinics the health care solution for employers?

As health care costs continue their long arc upward, what's a company to do? According to an article in the Washington Post, companies employing 10 or more workers paid an average of $10,588 per employee for health care benefits last year. Facing unsustainable financial pressure to provide health care benefits to their employees, many employers are shifting the cost to their employees: requiring them to pay higher insurance premiums and deductibles or by reducing services in health care plans.

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What are the ways your organization is forcing innovation?

"You know the old adage, "Change is good. You go first," quipped AAMC President Darrell Kirch at the association's annual meeting in early November. While that may have described the attitude of academic medical centers (AMCs) in the past, Kirch says he's finding more people are willing to go first.

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The question is are we going to support it or is it going to have to come from a consumer base?

In a recent interview with Eric Topol, M.D., at the AAMC 2012 conference, the Utah Innovation team heard one view of the role of both individualized health care and health care providers in the coming years. Topol is and has been an advocate for the use of wireless devices to empower patients by allowing them to tune in to their body via medical apps and other devices.

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