Jul

22

The Exceptional Huntsman Cancer Institute

This month, the Huntsman Cancer Institute achieved a significant milestone—the designation of Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute, joining an elite group of just over 40 cancer centers across the nation with this award. This designation reflects on the remarkable success the Huntsman Cancer Institute has had in catalyzing collaboration across the health sciences and university.

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May

31

On the Importance of Marrying Science with Compassion

At a time when the nation is so singularly focused on the business of health care –– on getting lean, bending the cost curve, and treating patients as consumers –– it can feel as if medicine has strayed from its roots, its raison d'être. Why, then, as I reflect on the challenges and opportunities facing our graduating Class of 2015, I am filled with so much optimism?

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May

12

A Low-Tech Tool for Everyone's Health Toolbox

Family health portraits are growing in importance as scientists race to find the genetic causes of all manner of diseases, and develop targeted drugs, treatments and personalized prevention plans. Most Americans understand this; 96 percent consider family health histories to be “very important” or “somewhat important,” according to 2014 survey by a pediatric oncologist and Associate Professor of Pediatrics here at the University of Utah. Yet fewer than 37 percent actively compile such information.

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Apr

15

Building a Global Force in Public Health, a "Light to all the World"

When people wonder why the University of Utah is spending time and resources cultivating relationships with countries like Ghana -- or China and Korea -- I tell them: Because having a global presence helps us think differently about health care, and enables us to apply global innovations locally, benefitting everyone in our community.

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Apr

10

U. Geneticists Unlocking Nature’s Mysteries and Clues to Life Saving Treatments

A University of Utah study published in Nature Genetics is the first to document how genes build the diaphragm. This is important, writes New York Times science writer Carl Zimmer, because the diaphragm appears to have played a pivotal role in our evolution as a species. It also helps explain what goes wrong in babies born with a catastrophic birth defect know as a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH).

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Mar

30

Research is not for the Faint of Heart

Imagine being a young scientist today. A steady drumbeat of authority figures have encouraged you to pursue science and technology. You’re told there’s a shortage of people trained to work in these fields. But by the time you finish your graduate work, you learn there are more Ph.D.’s than there is funding to support them––that your federal grant application has a one in six chance of getting funded.

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Feb

27

Fixing the science gender gap

Our mantra at the University of Utah is to be lifelong partners in health with our communities. Nurturing future generations (our young men and women) is how we can ensure that we’ll all be well looked after in the years to come.

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This blog reserves the right to edit and/or remove comments that are off topic, highly offensive, disclose personal health information, or disclose other protected information about an employee, patient, or business agreement at the University of Utah. Technical questions about the blog should be directed to vickie.king@hsc.utah.edu.