Academics & Research

Research

March 2017

Test Could Help Curb Unnecessary Antibiotic Use in Kids

When a doctor diagnoses a child with pneumonia, all too often the default is to prescribe antibiotics. Considering that antibiotics can cause serious side effects and overuse causes microbes to become resistant to the life-saving drugs, finding ways to curb the prescribing spree has become a public health priority. To make a dent in the problem, Stockman et al., have identified a rapid test that could tell physicians whether or not a child’s pneumonia is caused by bacterial infection.

Gene Linked to Early Menopause

While most women experience menopause around 51 years of age, women with primary ovarian insufficiency go through menopause before the age of 40, with some going through the life-altering event as early as in their teens. Corrine Welt, MD, professor of internal medicine at University of Utah Health, believes an answer may lie in the scores of genetic data housed in the Utah Population Database (UPDB).

How Cells Repair the “Bubble Wrap” that Protects DNA

Our DNA is wrapped in a bubble, a double membrane called the nuclear envelope, which protects it and directs molecular traffic to and from the nucleus. Many natural processes, such as cell division, create holes in the nuclear envelope, and for years, scientists have puzzled over how these gaps are filled. New research from the Department of Biochemistry and Department of Oncological Sciences has helped to elucidate this process, finding how an ancient pathway is recruited to do the job.